Attachment Styles - How They Affect Your Parenting (Infographic) - Parenting For Brain (2023)

Attachment styles | Child attachment | Adult attachment | How to determine | Attachment styles chart | 4 Attachment styles | Parenting styles and attachment | Infographic

What Is Attachment

An attachment is a bond created between a caregiver and a child due to the infant’s deep-rooted desire to remain close and connected to the attachment figure for survival.

Unlike many other species, human beings are born without the abilities to move, feed or defend themselves. The need for prolonged care means that infants are born with behaviors that can keep them close to attachment figures for protection.

Over 50 years ago, psychiatrist John Bowlby proposed the Attachment Theory. Bowlby believed that it’s human nature for infants to seek and maintain contact with the primary caregiver. These proximity-seeking attachment behaviors form a behavioral system or attachment strategies that can increase the likelihood of infant survival​1​.

Attachment Styles - How They Affect Your Parenting (Infographic) - Parenting For Brain (1)

What Are Attachment Styles

An attachment style is the pattern of behavior a child develops to maintain attachment with their caretaker. These infant attachment patterns developed in early childhood in response to their caregiver’s behavior can be categorized into four styles of attachment​2​:

  • Secure attachment style
  • Avoidant attachment style
  • Ambivalent attachment style
  • Disorganized attachment style

In the 1980s, social psychologists Cindy Hazan andPhillip Shaver found parallel attachment styles in adult relationships​3,4​ and proposed an extension to Bowlby’s attachment theory. They found that individual differences observed in infant attachment are manifested similarly to those in adult attachment.

The four adult attachment styles are:

  • Secure attachment style
  • Avoidant attachment style
  • Anxious attachment style
  • Fearful attachment style
Attachment Styles - How They Affect Your Parenting (Infographic) - Parenting For Brain (2)

Child Attachment Styles

A child’s attachment style is important because the types of attachment during childhood continue to have an impact on that individual in adulthood.

The attachment between children and their caregivers represents the ways one thinks about themselves, others, and their relationships​5​. Differences in attachment styles result from the infant-caregiver relationships.

The representations created out of these relationships are called the internal working model. They shape how one perceives themselves and the world around them. The models influence the child’s personalities, interpersonal styles, and how children handle their negative emotions in predictable ways.

For instance, those who believe that the world is a positive place will be able to rely on other people to help them cope with their emotional needs. But those who believe the world cannot support them will feel left on their own to cope. Therefore, individual differences in perceptions will affect their behavior and mental health.

Therefore, a child’s attachment style plays a significant role in their long-term relationships when they grow up.

Attachment styles in adults

The adult attachment theory proposed by Hazan and Shaver states that attachment orientations in early childhood can affect one’s attachment style​6​ in adulthood. The style of attachment in adults can predict how they behave and experience romantic love​7​. The adult attachment patterns can also affect the way they manage conflicts in intimate relationships​8​, mental control​9​, and relational experiences​10​.

In other words, early attachment experiences with caregivers set the foundation for how a person builds relationships as an adult.

However, studies have found that attachment styles in the child-parent domain are only moderately related to those in the romantic relationship domain. The stability of attachment can change over a child’s life given certain environmental changes​11​.

How To Determine One’s Attachment Style

There are three ways to determine a person’s attachment style, depending on whether the individual is a child or an adult.

1. The Strange Situation For Child

In the first year, an infant’s attachment styles can be detected through the Strange Situation experiment invented by Mary Ainsworth.

In this experiment, early attachment styles are identified through responses from young children to separation from and reunion with their mothers.

2. Adult Attachment Interview For Adult

Different attachment styles in adults can be identified through the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI).

In an AAI, interviewees answer open-ended questions about their past experiences with their parents.

3. Self-Report To Two Dimension Surveys For Adult

Attachment research shows that people’s attachment styles are characterized by two dimensions – attachment anxiety and attachment avoidance​12​.

The degrees of anxiety and avoidance predict one’s attachment strategies in their relationships with others.

Attachment Styles - How They Affect Your Parenting (Infographic) - Parenting For Brain (3)

Attachment Styles Chart

There are two major secondary attachment strategies that involve either hyperactivation or deactivation of the attachment system​1​.

Self-report of these two types of strategies can be mapped to one of the four main attachment styles.

A hyperactivating strategy is the fight in the fight-or-flight response. It is a response to thefrustration of attachmentneeds. In hyperactivating individuals, proximity-seeking does not cease. They anxiously escalate their attempts to coerce the parent’s support and love.These individuals are anxious and preoccupied with attachment.

(Video) The Attachment Theory: How Childhood Affects Life

A deactivating strategy is the flight reaction to the unresponsive parent. Deactivating individuals giveupproximity-seeking efforts, deactivate the attachment system without reestablishing attachment security, and try to deal with distress on their own. These people are dismissive or avoidant of attachment.

Attachment can be categorized based on an individual’s relative levels of anxiety and avoidance.

4 Attachment styles

Secure Attachment

Secure attachment style forms when the caretaker is often nearby, accessible and attentive to the child’s needs. The caregiver is emotionally available in times of need and responsive to the infant’s connection-seeking behavior.

Securely attached children feel loved, secure, and confident. These kids often explore the world freely while feeling confident that care and support will be available if they return to their secure base or safe haven.

In the strange situation experiment, secure infants tend to show distress during separation but then recover quickly and continue to explore the environment with interest. When united with their mother, they greet her with joy and affection, initiate physical contact with her, and respond positively to being held. These mothers are the sources of security.

Except for secure attachment styles, all other attachment styles are insecure attachments.

Secure children generally have higher self-esteem than insecurely attached children​13​. They are also more emotionally self-regulated compared to those with insecure attachment styles ​14​.

When they grow up, securely attached adults tend to have secure relationships with their romantic partners. They form an emotional connection and expect the partner to be emotionally available and responsive. Secure adults interact with people in positive ways and feel comfortable in relationships. They tend to have more stable relationships. Their security is also positively correlated with their relationship satisfaction.

In AAI, securely attached individuals describe healthy relationships with parents in a clear, convincing, and coherent way, or describe negative relationships coherently with perspective.

The secure attachment type tends to agree with these statements:

  • “I feel comfortable depending on other adults and I can also provide support to others.”
  • “I don’t worry about being abandoned.”
  • “It is relatively easy for me to get close to others and I am not concerned about being too close​15​.”

In the two-dimension survey, securely attached people identify themselves as low in anxiety and avoidance. They have a positive view of themselves and the world. They feel secure and self-confident. Secure adults are comfortable with closeness in important adult romantic relationships. When they are distressed, they seek support from others and cope with stress constructively.

Ambivalent Attachment

Ambivalent attachment style (also known as anxious resistant or anxious-ambivalent) is an insecure attachment style. Anxious attachment develops when infants receive inconsistent care from their parents. They become unsure regarding the availability of their caregivers, particularly in times of need. Anxious children are characterized by high levels of attachment-related anxiety.

In distress, ambivalent kids have approach-avoidance behavior towards their caregivers, mixing bids for comfort and support with withdrawal and strong expressions of anger. The doubt regarding the availability of an attachment figure leads to the development of an “uncertain maternal availability” working model of close others, or doubt regarding the behaviors of others in future relationships.

They seek intimacy but at the same time feel unsure about other people’s willingness to be close to them. Feeling unlovable is a common characteristic of these kids.

The equivalent attachment style in adulthood is called the Anxious Attachment or Preoccupied Attachment Style.

In AAI, anxious intervieweesare entangled in still-intense worries and conflicted feelings about their parents. They can easilyretrievememories about the relationship, buthave troublecoherently discussing them without anger or anxiety. They adopt a hyperactivating strategy to seek caregivers.

Anxious grownups identify themselves with these statements:

  • “I would like to be close to others, but they usually don’t want to because my emotional closeness often scares people.”
  • “I worry about not being loved. I am so unlovable.”

In the two-dimensional survey, an anxious adult reports high anxiety and low avoidance. They have a negative self-image but a positive view of the world. An individual with an anxious adult attachment style has a strong need for closeness, worries about relationships, and relies on hyperactivating strategies when seeking attachment in loving relationships.

Avoidant Attachment

Avoidant attachment forms when the attachment figure rejects an infant’s connection-seeking behaviors. These parents tend to be emotionally rigid and they get angry at their infants.

Kids with insecure-avoidant attachment tend to see others as uniformly cold, rejecting, or manipulative. They feel insecure in relationships. They are avoidant and maintain an emotional distance to protect themselves. They use deactivation as their coping strategy.

In the Strange Situation, avoidant kids are not distressed when separated from their mothers, and upon reunion, they avoid their mothers.

The equivalent adult style is also called the Dismissive-Avoidant Attachment Style.

In AAI, avoidant adults dismiss the importance of attachment relationships or idealize them but provide no clear examples to support their characterizations. These individuals are dismissive of their attachment.

These individuals are characterized by statements:

  • “I don’t feel safe close to others.”
  • “I have a hard time trusting people completely and it’s difficult for me to depend on others.”
  • “I get nervous when I reach a certain level of intimacy and others want to have a more emotional bond with me.”

Avoidant style is characterized by low anxiety but high avoidance. People with attachment-related avoidance tend to lack security, show compulsive self-reliance, prefer emotional distance from others, and rely on deactivating strategies. Some even believe they can become emotionally self-sufficient and live their lives without the support of the community or others. They may also appear hostile and show antisocial behavior toward others​16​.

(Video) 5 Parenting Styles and Their Effects on Life

Disorganized Attachment

Disorganized or disoriented attachment develops when the parent is also a source of threat or fear. This attachment style typically forms as a consequence of maltreatment.

These primary caregivers show a pattern of behaviors that are disorganized, unpredictable, discomforting, and frightening. Parents who engage in these behaviors are more likely to suffer from childhood trauma and unresolved losses of their own​17​.

During the Strange Situation, an infant with a disorganized attachment style is characterized by awkward behavior during separation and reunion episodes. They fluctuate between signs of anxiety and avoidance.

In adulthood, an equivalent attachment is called Fearful Attachment or Fearful-Avoidant Attachment Style.

In the AAI, the narrative contains indications of unresolved traumas or losses and is classified as “unresolved”.

A person with fearful-avoidant attachment styles is high in anxiety and avoidance.

Parenting styles and attachment

Parents’ attachment styles can influence their parenting, which in turn affects their children’s attachment styles.

Securely attached parents tend to have an authoritative parenting style, which is highly correlated with secure attachment type in the child​18​.

A parent with an insecure attachment style that involves avoidance or anxiety is more likely to show less sensitivity, support, and responsiveness, resulting in an insecure attachment pattern in their child​19​.

In general, attachment patterns tend to be transgenerational. Securely attached parents are more likely to raise secure children. Insecure parents tend to parent in a way that leaves their children with insecure attachments​20​.

Infographic

Attachment Styles - How They Affect Your Parenting (Infographic) - Parenting For Brain (4)

Final thoughts on attachment styles

Despite the intergenerational transmission tendency, people’s attachment styles are not set in stone. With determination, help and support, an insecurely attached person can develop earned security from an alternative support figure​21​.

References

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    (Video) Yuko Munakata: The science behind how parents affect child development | TED

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    Mikulincer M, Dolev T, Shaver PR. Attachment-Related Strategies During Thought Suppression: Ironic Rebounds and Vulnerable Self-Representations. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. Published online 2004:940-956. doi:10.1037/0022-3514.87.6.940

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    McCormick CB, Kennedy JH. Parent-child attachment working models and self-esteem in adolescence. J Youth Adolescence. Published online February 1994:1-18. doi:10.1007/bf01537139

    (Video) How early years trauma affects the brain the child who mistrusts good care HD

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    Calkins SD. Early attachment processes and the development of emotional self-regulation. In: Handbook of Self-Regulation: Research, Theory, and Applications. The Guilford Press; 2004:324–339.

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FAQs

How does your attachment style affect your parenting? ›

In general, attachment patterns tend to be transgenerational. Securely attached parents are more likely to raise secure children. Insecure parents tend to parent in a way that leaves their children with insecure attachments20.

How does attachment affect the brain? ›

Brain Development.

For example, talking, singing, and reading to children help form brain pathways related to language. Attachment affects brain development in two important ways. First, because the child feels safe and cared for, the brain can use its energy to develop pathways crucial for higher level thinking.

What are the 4 attachment styles in children? ›

Of the four patterns of attachment (secure, avoidant, resistant and disorganized), disorganized attachment in infancy and early childhood is recognized as a powerful predictor for serious psychopathology and maladjustment in children (2,18–24).

What do the 4 attachment styles mean? ›

There are four attachment styles: anxious (referred to as preoccupied in adults), avoidant (referred to as dismissive in adults), disorganized (referred to as fearful-avoidant in adults), and secure. Attachment styles refer to the particular way in which an individual relates to other people.

How does anxious attachment affect parenting? ›

The development of an anxious/preoccupied attachment style (referred to as anxious ambivalent in children) is often associated with an inconsistent parenting pattern. Sometimes, the parents will be supportive and responsive to the child's needs. At other times, they will be misattuned to the child.

Why is attachment important? ›

Attachment allows children the 'secure base' necessary to explore, learn and relate, and the wellbeing, motivation, and opportunity to do so. It is important for safety, stress regulation, adaptability, and resilience.

What part of the brain affects attachment? ›

The limbic system is the center of emotion, social behavior and attachment.

How does attachment affect mental health? ›

When children have a secure attachment with their parent/carer, it is an important protective factor for their mental health, while insecure attachments can be a risk factor for the development of emotional and behaviour problems.

What part of the brain do we sit in when we are seeking attachment? ›

The limbic system is the social and emotional part of the brain, governing attachment, nurturing instincts, learning, implicit memory (preverbal, unconscious), motivation, stress response, and the immune system.

Which of the four attachment styles is the most detrimental to a child's development? ›

The worst (and least common) type of attachment occurs when the parent is abusive or neglectful of the child.

What parenting style causes anxious attachment? ›

Children living with caregivers who are neglectful, abusive, or emotionally unavailable are more likely to develop anxious attachment. This attachment style can increase risk for anxiety disorders and low self-esteem later in life, and have a negative impact on relationships.

What kind of parenting causes avoidant attachment? ›

Parents who are strict and emotionally distant, do not tolerate the expression of feelings, and expect their child to be independent and tough might raise children with an avoidant attachment style. As adults, these children appear confident and self-sufficient.

What is the most common attachment style? ›

The secure attachment style is the most common type of attachment in western society. Research suggests that around 66% of the US population is securely attached. People who have developed this type of attachment are self-contented, social, warm, and easy to connect to.

How do I fix my attachment style? ›

There are a few primary ways to alter your attachment style. One is by getting into a long-term relationship with someone with a healthier attachment style than your own. The second is by making sense of your past through the process of writing a coherent narrative.

How insecure attachment affects development? ›

Babies and young children who have attachment issues may be more likely to develop behavioural problems such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or conduct disorder (Fearon et al, 2010)14. Children who have attachment issues can have difficulty forming healthy relationships when they grow up.

What causes attachment issues? ›

The exact cause of attachment disorders is not known, but research suggests that inadequate care-giving is a possible cause. The physical, emotional and social problems associated with attachment disorders may persist as the child grows older.

How does attachment affect development? ›

Attachment essentially can establish a positive or negative path for childhood development that will impact the way children form bonds and interact with others into adulthood. Attachment is critical in childhood development, and children do not all receive equal opportunities for successful attachments.

How do you explain attachment? ›

Attachment can be defined as a deep and enduring emotional bond between two people in which each seeks closeness and feels more secure when in the presence of the attachment figure. Attachment behavior in adults towards the child includes responding sensitively and appropriately to the child's needs.

What happens if a child does not form an attachment? ›

We now know that it is crucial for parents to form a strong and loving attachment to their babies. If they do not, their children will be at risk for a variety of emotional, social and learning problems as they go through childhood and into adolescence and adulthood.

How do I create a secure attachment with my child? ›

How do I create a secure attachment with my baby?
  1. Hold and cuddle your baby. ...
  2. Make eye contact. ...
  3. Watch and listen to your baby. ...
  4. Comfort your baby every time she cries. ...
  5. Speak in a warm, soothing tone of voice. ...
  6. Maintain realistic expectations of your baby. ...
  7. Practice being fully present. ...
  8. Practice being self-aware.
18 Apr 2015

How does attachment style affect cognitive development? ›

Secure mother-infant attachment predicts a better cognitive and behavioural outcome; whereas insecure attachment, especially the resistant attachment, may lead to a lower cognitive level and greater behavioural problems in early childhood.

What emotion activates our attachment systems? ›

When the anxious attachment style feels that something is not right in their relationship their attachment system activates. The attachment system is a mechanism in the brain that is responsible for monitoring and tracking the safety and availability of our attachment figures.

What falling in love does to your brain? ›

Researchers have scanned the brains of people who are madly in love and found a heavy surge of dopamine, a neurotransmitter in the brain's reward system that helps people feel pleasure. Dopamine, along with other chemicals, gives us that energy, focus, and obsession we feel when we're wild about someone.

How does poor attachment affect the developing child? ›

Children with poor attachments tend to display poor socioemotional affects, such as, poor social, coping, and problem solving skills, tantrums, clingy, withdrawn, or aggressive behaviors, etc. These negative effects, often impacts the child throughout their developmental years.

What are attachment needs? ›

Attachment involves developing behaviours to ensure the proximity of a caregiver in times of stress. There is no right or wrong way for a child to resolve this need; a child may meet their attachment needs in a range of ways, depending on their experience with a caregiver.

How do you know if you have attachment issues? ›

Symptoms of attachment issues

Difficulty forming emotional bonds to others. Limited experience of positive emotions. Difficulty with physical or emotional closeness or boundaries. Anxiety.

How does the brain affect our behavior? ›

The brain receives information and internal and external influences that enable the most appropriate behaviors to be triggered at any time. In addition, our behavior has environmental consequences, which can be experienced as positive or negative for us.

What part of the brain controls emotions and feelings? ›

The limbic system controls the experience and expression of emotions, as well as some automatic functions of the body. By producing emotions (such as fear, anger, pleasure, and sadness), the limbic system enables people to behave in ways that help them communicate and survive physical and psychologic upsets.

How do different parts of the brain influence our behavior? ›

The frontal lobe is primarily responsible for thinking, planning, memory, and judgment. The parietal lobe is primarily responsible for bodily sensations and touch. The temporal lobe is primarily responsible for hearing and language. The occipital lobe is primarily responsible for vision.

What is the healthiest attachment style? ›

Although it is a spectrum of four styles, common parlance refers to only three: anxious, avoidant and secure. Studies show that people who are securely attached have the healthiest relationships, and it's the type that everyone should strive for.

Which family influences have been found to affect attachment? ›

Income and family size, parental age and education, major stressful events, such as loss of a parent, birth of a sibling, severe illness, marital relationships and breakdown affect the quality of attachment relationships [13-19].

What is the least common attachment style? ›

Fearful-avoidant

This is the least common type of attachment style, but it can also be the most difficult. Again, while there are many factors that contribute to the development of attachment styles, early childhood influences are often key.

How attachment styles are formed? ›

Researchers believe attachment style is formed within our first year of living, between 7 to 11 months of age, according to mental health counselor Grace Suh, LMHC, LPC. According to Mancao, it's "determined by how the primary caregiver responds to the child's cues when they are experiencing emotional stress."

What attachment style is clingy? ›

Individuals with an anxious attachment style are characterized with: Being clingy. Having an intensely persistent and hypervigilant alertness towards their partner's actions or inactions.

Do Avoidants make good parents? ›

Parents of children with an avoidant attachment tend to be emotionally unavailable or unresponsive to them a good deal of the time. They disregard or ignore their children's needs, and can be especially rejecting when their child is hurt or sick.

What does avoidant attachment turn into? ›

As children with avoidant attachment grow up, they may show signs in later relationships and behaviors, including: Trouble showing or feeling their emotions. Discomfort with physical closeness and touch. Accusing their partner of being too clingy or overly attached.

What are fearful Avoidants like as parents? ›

Signs of Fearful Avoidant Attachment Style in Parents

They generally do not like to become caregivers4. Because they have difficulty providing emotional support to others, when they do become parents, they also have difficulty providing supportive care to their children.

Which attachment style is associated with the most positive outcomes? ›

Based on the findings of this study, the most common attachment style was secure attachment style, which could be a positive prognostic factor in medical students, helping them to manage stress.

What is the unhealthiest attachment style? ›

Anxious-avoidant attachment types (also known as the “fearful or disorganized type”) bring together the worst of both worlds. Anxious-avoidants are not only afraid of intimacy and commitment, but they distrust and lash out emotionally at anyone who tries to get close to them.

What is healthy attachment relationship? ›

Couples who are securely attached in their relationships tend to share the following traits: They desire closeness and enjoy emotional and physical intimacy. They are emotionally available to each other. They are aware of their feelings, share them openly and have empathy for their partner's feelings.

How do I switch from insecure to secure attachment? ›

How to develop a secure attachment style as an adult
  1. Actively working on your relationship with yourself.
  2. Purging toxic or counterproductive relationships.
  3. Building your self-esteem.
  4. Healthily expressing your emotions.
  5. Lean on the support of friends and family.
  6. Work on healing from past negative experiences in therapy.
14 Feb 2022

How do you break anxious attachment style? ›

How can you self-soothe anxious attachment?
  1. Practice awareness. If you have an anxious attachment, you may be more likely to have automatic responses to negativity. ...
  2. Regulate your nervous system. ...
  3. Reparent your inner child. ...
  4. Challenge your thoughts. ...
  5. Self-care. ...
  6. Externalise your feelings. ...
  7. Practice mindful communication. ...
  8. Therapy.
6 Jun 2022

How I healed my anxious attachment style? ›

Healing anxious attachment: 5 steps to move towards relationship security
  1. Develop your sense of self. The first step to healing anxious attachment is developing your sense of self. ...
  2. Learn to meet your own emotional needs. ...
  3. Learn to distinguish your emotional triggers from reality. ...
  4. Ask for what you need. ...
  5. Stop people pleasing.
22 Aug 2022

Can trauma change your attachment style? ›

And, trauma can leave a lasting impact on the way we attach to others in adulthood. Trauma experienced in early childhood or even experienced later in life, can all have an impact on shaping someone's attachment style. So, trauma experienced in childhood can also cause the child to have an insecure attachment.

What does healthy attachment look like? ›

Secure attachment style: what it looks like

Empathetic and able to set appropriate boundaries, people with secure attachment tend to feel safe, stable, and more satisfied in their close relationships. While they don't fear being on their own, they usually thrive in close, meaningful relationships.

How does attachment style affect relationships? ›

People with anxious attachment styles tend to be insecure about their relationships, fear abandonment, and often seek validation. Those with avoidant styles have a prevailing need to feel loved but are largely emotionally unavailable in their relationships.

What parenting style leads to insecure attachment? ›

Authoritarian and neglectful parenting styles will lead to insecure attachment, resulting in the development of a low level of self-regulation, which in turn increases the children's addiction susceptibility.

Do Avoidants make good parents? ›

Parents of children with an avoidant attachment tend to be emotionally unavailable or unresponsive to them a good deal of the time. They disregard or ignore their children's needs, and can be especially rejecting when their child is hurt or sick.

What kind of parenting causes avoidant attachment? ›

Parents who are strict and emotionally distant, do not tolerate the expression of feelings, and expect their child to be independent and tough might raise children with an avoidant attachment style. As adults, these children appear confident and self-sufficient.

What parenting style causes anxious attachment? ›

Children living with caregivers who are neglectful, abusive, or emotionally unavailable are more likely to develop anxious attachment. This attachment style can increase risk for anxiety disorders and low self-esteem later in life, and have a negative impact on relationships.

What are the effects of parenting styles? ›

Parenting style has an effect on self- efficacy, self-respect, self-development, and academic motivation, as well as the behaviours of the individual (Brown & Iyengar, 2008). One of the issues affecting individual learning is the parent's attitude towards the child.

How can I improve my attachment style? ›

How to develop a secure attachment style as an adult
  1. Actively working on your relationship with yourself.
  2. Purging toxic or counterproductive relationships.
  3. Building your self-esteem.
  4. Healthily expressing your emotions.
  5. Lean on the support of friends and family.
  6. Work on healing from past negative experiences in therapy.
14 Feb 2022

What age do attachment styles develop? ›

Attachment styles are typically developed in infancy based on our relationships with our earliest caregivers. Researchers believe attachment style is formed within our first year of living, between 7 to 11 months of age, according to mental health counselor Grace Suh, LMHC, LPC.

Are Avoidants narcissists? ›

Avoidants are not all narcissists but they do have an ability to detach emotionally from the relationship which triggers an “anxious” person's attachment anxiety.

What are Avoidants afraid of? ›

They fear closeness to their partners and avoid them because of the possibility of rejection. They don't feel comfortable getting close to others. Avoidant adults worry about being hurt if they allow themselves to become too close to others. They find it difficult to trust or depend on others completely.

How do Avoidants treat their children? ›

Avoidant/Dismissive Attachment – In an avoidant/dismissive attachment, the parent may meet the child's basic needs, but he or she will have trouble responding to the child on an emotional level.

What does avoidant attachment turn into? ›

As children with avoidant attachment grow up, they may show signs in later relationships and behaviors, including: Trouble showing or feeling their emotions. Discomfort with physical closeness and touch. Accusing their partner of being too clingy or overly attached.

Why do people develop avoidant attachment? ›

Avoidant attachment develops when an infant or young child has a parent or caregiver who is consistently emotionally unavailable or unresponsive to their needs. Infants with an avoidant attachment style may also have faced repeated discouragement from crying or expressing outward emotion.

What are avoidant attachment styles attracted to? ›

Whereas anxious attachment styles crave emotional and physical intimacy, avoidants prefer to minimize emotional closeness and prefers sexual intimacy.

What causes attachment issues? ›

The exact cause of attachment disorders is not known, but research suggests that inadequate care-giving is a possible cause. The physical, emotional and social problems associated with attachment disorders may persist as the child grows older.

What attachment style is clingy? ›

Individuals with an anxious attachment style are characterized with: Being clingy. Having an intensely persistent and hypervigilant alertness towards their partner's actions or inactions.

Videos

1. Childhood Trauma and the Brain | UK Trauma Council
(Anna Freud NCCF)
2. Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs): Impact on brain, body and behaviour
(IHDCYH Talks | Entretiens de l'IDSEA)
3. Bowen Family Systems Theory
(PopPsych)
4. The benefits of a bilingual brain - Mia Nacamulli
(TED-Ed)
5. 30 Strategies for Rewiring the Traumatized Brain and Undoing the Effects of Trauma
(Doc Snipes)
6. How Unloving Parents Generate Self-Hating Children
(The School of Life)
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